A Message to the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF)

A Message to the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) from zoe young on Vimeo.

Nakuru Lemiruni sends a message to those responsible for evicting the Samburu tribe from their land..

The Samburu of Kisargei, in Kenya’s Laikipia district, were brutally evicted from the lands they call home in 2010 after the land was sold to the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF). AWF, using funds from The Nature Conservancy (TNC), says it bought the land on the understanding that no-one lived there. When the Samburu protested and took the matter to the courts the land was hurriedly ‘gifted’ to the government.

Police chose a Friday “market day” for their attack, when the men were away and only women, elders, and children were in their homes. Fanning out across the 17,000- acre Eland Downs Ranch, police burned the Samburu families’ homes to the ground, along with all their possessions.

Identified in the Kenyan press as “squatters,” the evicted Samburu families petitioned a regional court to recognize their ancestral claims to the land where they lived and grazed their cattle The suit has been filed by the Samburu against the African Wildlife Foundation and the former President.They need money and public support to win.

Comparing alternative media in North and South: the cases of IFIWatchnet and Indymedia in Africa’ Environment and Planning A 1173 – 1189

Abstract. Alternative media form an important part of the global mediascape. Research on this phenomenon is, however, often drawn from studies in the ‘global North’. In this paper we discuss alternative media in the ‘global South’, by exploring two case studies of cooperation between Northern and Southern partners: IFIWatchnet in South America, and Indymedia Centre in Africa. We highlight how Northern and Southern partners differed in identity, organizational forms, and accountability. We find that Northern partners were oriented to more ‘marginal’ identities, fluid organizational structures, and informal structures of accountability. In contrast, Southern activists articulated more ‘mainstream’ identities, relied on more structured forms, and linked to formalized modes of accountability. The result was often significant clashes over what it meant to be alternative media, how alternative media should be organized, and how people should be held to account. This meant that North – South cooperation was often fraught with struggle. These difficulties are reminiscent of the limitations of creating global cooperation through seeking to spread modes of activist organization developed in the North, which emphasize autonomy, networks, fluidity, and, in some instances, direct action. Authors:  Fabian Frenzel, Steffen Boehm, Pennie Quinton, André Spicer, Sian Sullivan, Zoe Young

http://epn.sagepub.com/content/43/5/1173.abstract?id=a43539

The Endorois Case – Litigating the Right to Development

The Endorois Case – Litigating the Right to Development from zoe young on Vimeo.

In the 1970s, the Endorois people of Kenya’s Rift Valley were forced from their land to make way for the Lake Bogoria National Reserve. In 2010, they won their case before the African Commission on Peoples’ and Human Rights, creating a major legal precedent for the Right to Development and recognising indigenous people’s rights over traditional lands and resources.

More information available from the Minority Rights Group International: minorityrights.org/9587/press-releases/landmark-decision-rules-kenyas-removal-of-indigenous-people-from-ancestral-land-illegal.html

This clip was edited by Zoe Young from two earlier films, and screened at the United Nations OHCHR Social Forum, marking 25 Years of the Right to Development: ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Poverty/SForum/Pages/SForum2011.aspx.

What I Used To Know – Ghana

I’m a better adventurer than an IT project manager, so when a colleague from Friends of the Earth Ghana called in 2010 to say that they needed a film about the Witch Camps, I was soon back amongst the mud huts, learning about systemic injustice on a family scale through the eyes of women survivors of violent witch hunts. Another serious eye opener, our film for SOSYWEN – What I Used to Know – went on Ghana TV and is used in human rights education. I continue to work with WHRIN producing expert testimonies on witchcraft abuse.

Banking in the Shadows

Banking in the Shadows from zoe young on Vimeo.

What’s happening there in the shadows?

A tour of financial institutions complicit in illicit activities and sheltering from public view in the tax haven of Jersey, Channel Islands.

Featuring John Christensen of Tax Justice Network, Nick Hildyard of the Cornerhouse, Alex Cobham of Christian Aid, Nessa ni Casaidhe of Debt and Development Coalition and many more…

“Silent Spring in the Land of the Eternal Spring – Searching for Rachel Carson in Guatemala”

"Silent Spring in the Land of the Eternal Spring – Searching for Rachel Carson in Guatemala" from zoe young on Vimeo.

When Liza Grandia was young she worked with Conservation International (CI) in Guatemala’s Maya Bioshere Reserve. Inspired by Rachel Carson’s work in the USA, she hoped to build local environmental movements for protection of forests full of ancient archaeology, vibrant indigenous cultures and rare and wild creatures.

But it seemed her employers had other ideas.

Here, she tells a tale of institutional myopia, betrayal and systematic failure in big conservation. Now a cancer survivor, a mother and a clear eyed university professor, her story needs to be heard to be believed..

Read more:

2012. “Imagining a New Wildlife Politics: Conservation Contrarians and Corporate Elephants in the Room.”
A Review Essay of Rosaleen Duffy’s ‘Nature Crime: How We Are Getting Nature Wrong’.
Journal of International Wildlife Law and Policy 15(1): 95-114.
tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13880292.2011.650607?journalCode=uwlp20

2009. “Silent Spring in the Land of Eternal Spring: The Germination of a Conservation Conflict.”
Current Conservation 3(3): 10-13.
issuu.com/currentconservation/docs/cc_3.3?mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222

Liza’s bio: clarku.edu/faculty/facultybio.cfm?id=663

Update from Liza, November 2012:

Without a community base, CI had trouble fundraising in Guatemala and closed their offices in 2011 with a characteristically slick CI report that takes false credit for a lot of things CI had nothing to do with.

ProPeten’s work continues along quite well: propeten.org

This presentation was recorded in May 2008 for the symposium:
“Problematizing Neoliberal Biodiversity Conservation: Displaced and Disobedient Knowledge”
Washington D.C., American University, Department of Anthropology, May 16-19, 2008
Organizers: Jim Igoe (Dartmouth College, Department of Anthropology) & Sian Sullivan (Birkbeck School of Geography, University of London, )

An Executive Summary for the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) is available here:
pubs.iied.org/pdfs/G02526.pdf

A special issue of Current Conservation also features articles by several of the contributors:
issuu.com/currentconservation/docs/cc_3.3?mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Kartik Shankar: Turtle Conservation in Orissa, India

Kartik Shankar: Turtle Conservation in Orissa, India from zoe young on Vimeo.

This presentation was recorded in May 2008 for the symposium:
“Problematizing Neoliberal Biodiversity Conservation: Displaced and Disobedient Knowledge”
Washington D.C., American University, Department of Anthropology, May 16-19, 2008
Organizers: Jim Igoe (Dartmouth College, Department of Anthropology) & Sian Sullivan (Birkbeck School of Geography, University of London, )

An Executive Summary for the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED) is available here:
pubs.iied.org/pdfs/G02526.pdf

A special issue of Current Conservation also features articles by several of the contributors:
issuu.com/currentconservation/docs/cc_3.3?mode=window&backgroundColor=%23222222

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

The Endorois Case – Litigating the Right to Development

The Endorois Case – Litigating the Right to Development from zoe young on Vimeo.

 

In the 1970s, the Endorois people of Kenya’s Rift Valley were forced from their land to make way for the Lake Bogoria National Reserve. In 2010, they won their case before the African Commission on Peoples’ and Human Rights, creating a major legal precedent for the Right to Development and recognising indigenous people’s rights over traditional lands and resources.

More information available from the Minority Rights Group International:minorityrights.org/9587/press-releases/landmark-decision-rules-kenyas-removal-of-indigenous-people-from-ancestral-land-illegal.html

This clip was edited by Zoe Young from two earlier films, and screened at the United Nations OHCHR Social Forum, marking 25 Years of the Right to Development:ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Poverty/SForum/Pages/SForum2011.aspx.